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(Article of periodic en Anglais - 1980)

Document title

Late-Quaternary vegetation history at White Pond on the inner coastal plain of South Carolina

Authors(s) and Affiliation(s)

WATTS W. A. ;

Abstract

At White Pont near Columbia, South Carolina, a pollen assemblage of Pinus banksiana (jack pine), Picea (spruce), and herbs is dated between 19,100 and 12,800C yr B.P. Plants of sandhill habitats are more prominent than at other sites of similar age, and pollen of deciduous trees is infrequent. The vegetation was probably a mosaic of pine and spruce stands with prairies and sand-dune vegetation. The climate may have been like that of the eastern boreal forest today. C dates of 12,800 and 9500 yr B.P. bracket a time when Quercus (oak), Carya (hickory), Fagus (beech), and Ostrya-Carpinus (ironwood) dominated the vegetation. It is estimated that beech and hickory made up at least 25% of the forest trees. Conifers were rare or absent. The environment is interpreted as hickory-rich mesic deciduous forest with a climate similar to but slightly warmer than that of the northern hardwoods region of western New York State. After 9500 yr B.P. oak and pine forest dominated the landscape, with pine becoming the most important tree genus in the later Holocene.

Source

Article of periodic

published at : Quaternary research New York

Editor :

Millesime : 1980, vol. 13, no2 [pp. 187-199]

Bibliographic references : 39réf.

Language

Anglais

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