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(Article of periodic - 2008)

Document title

Environmental change, geomorphic processes and land degradation in tropical highlands. Special issue

Authors(s) and Affiliation(s)

NYSSEN J. (a1) (Editeur scientifique) ; POESEN J. (a2) (Editeur scientifique) ; HAREGEWEYN N. (a3) (Editeur scientifique) ; PARSONS T. (a4) (Editeur scientifique) ;
(a1) Dept of Geography, University of Ghent, Ghent, BELGIQUE
(a2) Physical and Regional Geography, K.Univ., Leuven, BELGIQUE
(a3) Dept. of Land Resource Management and Environmental Protection, Mekelle Univ., Mekelle, ETHIOPIE
(a4) Dept. of Geography, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, ROYAUME-UNI

Abstract

This special issue presents a selected number of studies reflecting the state of the art of geomorphological research in tropical mountains. The debate whether human impact overrides natural factors in geomorphological processes in the second part of the Holocene is not closed. OLIVEIRA et al. (2008-this issue) attributes the variability in the stratigraphy of near-valley head deposits (including the Holocene) to climatic forcing. The archaeological site of Axum offers the opportunity to link human activities such as ploughing and the induced soil loss (CIAMPALINI et al., 2008), to the age of human occupation and the land-use changes that have occurred ever since (SCHMID et al., 2008). Here, VAN DE WAUW et al. (2008)) could also demonstrate that the current soilscape has not much in common with the soilscape before agriculture started, as it is governed by the presence of deeply eroded soil profiles and thick colluvial deposits which result in the presence of young soils in most places. One of the major processes resulting in this rejuvenation of parent material in many tropical areas is the presence of ancient and active lanslide bodies (MOEYERSONS et al., 2008). TURKELBOOM et al. (2008) demonstrate the negative impacts of current land-use intensification on the natural hydrological equilibrium. In contrast to this is the situation in north Ethiopia, where MUNRO et al.(2008) with repeat photography over a period of 30 years found decreased soil loss rates, which they link to the introduction of soil and water-conservation activities

Source

Thematical fascicle

published at : Catena / ISSN 0341-8162

Editor : Catena, Cremlingen-Destedt - ALLEMAGNE (1973)

Millesime : 2008, vol. 75, no 1 [pp. 1-127]

Bibliographic references : dissem.

Collation : fig., tabl.

Language

Anglais

INIST-CNRS, Cote INIST : 16767

Tous droits réservés © Prodig - Bibliographie Géographique Internationale (BGI), 2008
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