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(Article of periodic en Anglais - 2013)

Document title

Development and persistence of an African mire : How the oldest South African fen has survived in a marginal climate

Authors(s) and Affiliation(s)

GRUNDLING P. (1 2) ; GROOTJANS A.P. (3 4) ; PRICE J.S. (2) ; ELLERY W.N. (5) ;
(1) Univ. of Free State, AFRIQUE DU SUD
(2) Univ., Waterloo, CANADA
(3) Center for Energy and Environmental Sciences IVEM, Univ., Groningen, PAYS-BAS
(4) Inst. of Water and Wetland Research, Radboud Univ., Nijmegen, PAYS-BAS
(5) Univ., Rhodes, AFRIQUE DU SUD

Abstract

The geological and geomorphological setting of the Mfabeni Mire, located on the Eastern Shores of Lake St. Lucia in northern KwaZulu-Natal, was studied as well as its stratigraphy and chronology. The basal peat of the mire was at a depth of 9.9 m dated at ca. 44,000 cal years Before Present (BP). The average accumulation rate during the Late Pleistocene was 0.15 mm/year. During the Holocene it was higher (0.3 mm/year). Despite climate change over this period, peat formation has been interrupted, suggesting that the system has been able to almost continuously sustain peat formation processes. This is possible because the peatland is situated in a valley that is bordered by a highly permeable sand dune cordon with an elevated groundwater table that directs groundwater towards the mire. The infilling of the valley by peat has resulted in a basin with lower permeability than in the surrounding dunes, forcing the water table in the adjacent aquifer to rise, thus ensuring the mire system a supply of groundwater that is large enough to dampen the effects of climatic variation

Source

Article of periodic

published at : Catena / ISSN 0341-8162

Editor : Catena, Cremlingen-Destedt - ALLEMAGNE (1973)

Millesime : 2013, vol. 110 [pp. 176-183]

Bibliographic references : 1 p.

Collation : 6 fig., 1 tabl.

Language

Anglais

INIST-CNRS, Cote INIST : 16767

Digital Object Identifier

Go to electronic document thanks to its DOI : doi:10.1016/j.catena.2013.06.004

Tous droits réservés © Prodig - Bibliographie Géographique Internationale (BGI), 2013
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